Shale Boom Sets Off A Midwest Sand Boom

Mark Perry
updated | Author's Website

From the WSJ article “Midwest Sees a Sand Rush” (with video above):

“Sand is in high demand among U.S. oil and natural-gas producers, setting off a sand rush in Wisconsin, Minnesota and other Midwestern states. Sand mined in the Midwest is used in places such as North Dakota and Pennsylvania to tap oil and gas reserves. 


Sand mined in the Midwest is used in places such as North Dakota and Pennsylvania to tap oil and gas reserves. The U.S. producers’ demand for sand reached 28.7 million tons in 2011, up from six million tons in 2007 (see chart above). 

The surging demand is making sand the Midwest slice of a national energy boom. Oil and gas producers in recent years have greatly boosted the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to tap reserves once out of reach. Sand, injected deep underground to prop open fractures in shale formations and allow oil and gas to flow out, is important in “fracking.”
Wisconsin and Minnesota have abundant supplies of the type of sand that oil and gas producers need. Geological conditions were right hundreds of millions of years ago to form sand hard enough to withstand the pressure thousands of feet underground, while also having round grains that leave space so the oil and gas can escape. Fracking sand can fetch around $50 a ton, depending on quality.”

MP: Drill, drill, drill = jobs, jobs, jobs in many supporting industries like fracking sand. 

HT: Jon Murhphy

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